What is Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy is the practice of using the natural oils extracted from flowers, bark, stems, leaves, roots or other parts of a plant to enhance psychological and physical well-being.

The inhaled aroma from these “essential” oils is widely believed to stimulate brain function. Essential oils can also be absorbed through the skin, where they travel through the bloodstream and can promote whole-body healing.

A form of alternative medicine, aromatherapy is gaining momentum. It is used for a variety of applications, including pain relief, mood enhancement and increased cognitive function.

There are a wide number of essential oils available, each with its own healing properties

What is an Aromatherapist?

Aromatherapists treat a variety of physical conditions, illnesses and psychological disorders with essential aromatic oils that are extracted or distilled from flowers, trees, spices, fruits or herbs.

The typical responsibilities of an aromatherapist include:

  • undertaking patient consultations
  • identifying appropriate essential oils
  • planning and explaining treatment requirements
  • creating blends of oils
  • applying oils (often via therapeutic massage) and undertaking treatment
  • liaising with GPs and making referrals to specialists and other health care practitioners
  • providing advice about diet, exercise and lifestyle
  • keeping accurate confidential patient records
  • keeping up-to-date with research and new developments in the profession
  • marketing and promoting their practice
  • In order to be a Certified Aromatherapist one must complete a cetification program by an Aromatherapy School. A listing of some Aromatherapy Schools may be found by visiting the NAHA website Clicking Here. You may also see NAHA standards that every Aromatherapist must meet by Clicking Here.

What Are Essential Oils?

Essential oils are the highly concentrated version of the natural oils in plants. Getting essential oils from plants is done with a process called distillation, most commonly distillation by steam or water, where many parts of the plants are being used, including the plant roots, leaves, stems, flowers, or bark.

Essential oils are used extensively in aromatherapy and various traditional medicines. Due to the numerous health benefits of essential oils, they are increasingly being explored by the scientific community for the treatment of a variety of diseases including cancer, HIV, asthma, bronchitis, heart strokes, and many more. There are more than 90 essential oils, and each has its own health benefits. Most essential oils blend well with other essential oils in terms of function and odor, which allows herbalists to prepare a vast repertoire of aromatic essential oil combinations.

Click Here for a list of Essential Oil Info, their benefits, and uses.